Farkas Q&A: How I Made Practice Group Chair

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Pryor Cashman Partner Ilene Farkas, co-chair of the Litigation and Music Groups, was profiled in Law.com's "How I Made Practice Group Chair" series.
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Pryor Cashman Partner Ilene Farkas, co-chair of the Litigation and Music Groups, was profiled in Law.com's "How I Made Practice Group Chair" series.

In the Q&A, "How I Made Practice Group Chair: 'Communication Is Key, and the Human Component Cannot Be Understated,'" Ilene discusses the skill sets practice leaders need to be effective:

There are the core practice skills, as well as the ability to make judgment calls, be an accessible sounding board for your colleagues, and identify and be proactive about areas of growth. We have always prided ourselves in serving our clients efficiently and effectively, thanks to our talented roster of litigators and lean staffing models, where associates learn and develop from the beginning of their careers.

An effective practice leader should be someone who attorneys in the department can approach with ideas or issues, and someone who is motivated to solve problems as they arise. I've always been a problem-solver, and it serves me well in this role.

She also shares advice for lawyers looking to become practice leaders:

Understanding the needs of your clients and their businesses, and providing efficient, effective and top-rate service is of course paramount. But being an effective leader is more than that— communication is key, and the human component—identifying, hiring, developing, supporting and retaining talented attorneys—cannot be understated. And of course, there is so much a leader gets from listening to colleagues and seeking out their opinions.

Read the full Q&A using the link below (subscription may be required).

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